sanderlust:

my biggest fear is falling and dying in the shower and my family finding me naked

(Source: 23jan)

theniftyfifties:

James Dean photographed in his dressing room by Richard C. Miller.

theniftyfifties:

James Dean photographed in his dressing room by Richard C. Miller.

nprcodeswitch:

Native American Artists Reclaim Images That Represent Them
There’s been a lot of discussion about the name of a certain Washington football team — withlawsuits arguing that it is disparaging, and media outlets choosing not to use it in their content.
But while the debates around the language are raging, the logo — also a part of the trademark lawsuit — remains emblazoned on hats, T-shirts, and picnic blankets around the capital.
The logo has been the team’s brand ambassador for a long time and this team isn’t the only sports team to use Native American imagery. It’s also not something that is exclusive to sports teams; caricatures and motifs depicting indigenous people have long been used to sell stuff — cigars for one, but also things like chewing gum and butter.
But there is another body of artwork out there — produced by Native American artists and entrepreneurs — that asserts ownership over the images associated with their culture. Their work counters the existing “non-Native” representations, questions these portrayals and provides new context.
Photo Credit: Sarah Sense

nprcodeswitch:

Native American Artists Reclaim Images That Represent Them

There’s been a lot of discussion about the name of a certain Washington football team — withlawsuits arguing that it is disparaging, and media outlets choosing not to use it in their content.

But while the debates around the language are raging, the logo — also a part of the trademark lawsuit — remains emblazoned on hats, T-shirts, and picnic blankets around the capital.

The logo has been the team’s brand ambassador for a long time and this team isn’t the only sports team to use Native American imagery. It’s also not something that is exclusive to sports teams; caricatures and motifs depicting indigenous people have long been used to sell stuff — cigars for one, but also things like chewing gum and butter.

But there is another body of artwork out there — produced by Native American artists and entrepreneurs — that asserts ownership over the images associated with their culture. Their work counters the existing “non-Native” representations, questions these portrayals and provides new context.

Photo Credit: Sarah Sense

teachingliteracy:

In-Car-Nito Secret Book Storage

In-Car-Nito is such a cool idea. On the surface, it is just a vintage looking book about driving sitting in your car’s glove box. It looks nice, but nothing much to see here. OH HANG ON - turns out this innocent looking object is in fact a storage box for stuff you sometimes can’t avoid leaving in the car. Think sat nav, stereo fascia etc…

In-Car-Nito is sturdy but lightweight and extremely useful. It keeps your precious things incognito!